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Our Vision is a World Where Dyslexic Individuals are Known for their Strengths

How to Help a Dyslexic Student in a General Education Classroom – Part I

From the Connecticut Longitudinal Study, up to 1 in 6 students are dyslexic, but only a minority of these students will be found in special education classrooms. What does this mean for regular classroom teachers?

1. Get Basic Facts about Dyslexia – Dyslexic students ARE in your classroom, although you may not have identified them and […]

Shakespeare and Dyslexia – Making Words Physical [Premium]

Today is National Shakespeare Day, and dyslexia and Shakespeare have been on our minds. We recently mentioned that Lloyd Everitt (yes, he’s dyslexic) is the youngest actor to play Othello at Shakespeare’s own Globe Theater. But we’ve also been thinking about Shakespeare recently because, on our trip down to California, we had the pleasure of […]
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Response to Intervention RTI Hurts Students with Dyslexia

RTI or Response To Intervention is currently the dominant approach to reading instruction in public schools across the United States (over 70% of school districts), but in a just-released progress report funded by the Department of Education from the Institute of Education Sciences (IES), there’s a big problem…it doesn’t work.

RTI was supported by vocal […]

Dyslexia in 5 Minutes for Teachers [Premium]

 Watch this 5 minute video for teachers that covers dyslexia, its incidence, the intelligence of students, the discrepancy between fund of knowledge and ease of expression, why reading is hard for dyslexic students, the importance of multisensory learning, assistive technology, writing and spelling, memory and working memory, and math / dyscalculia.
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Doing Math : Inchworms vs. Grasshoppers [Premium]

‘If a child does not learn the way you teach then teach him the way he learns.’ Two American school teachers noticed that their students tended to prefer one of the two ways their teachers explained math. The inchworm style was part-to-whole, dutifully performing incremental step-by-step pencil work, following the solving of math problems more […]
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