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Who Will Read? Stealth Dyslexia in The New Yorker

This week’s New Yorker has a wonderful article How Children Read about the pioneering work of Dr. Fumiko Hoeft in the area of Stealth Dyslexia, a term Brock and I coined years ago to describe individuals who ‘fly under the radar’ of detection of dyslexia because they may achieve high levels of reading comprehension although single word […]

Higher Creativity with Lower Working Memory – Surprises of ADHD, Dyslexia, Giftedness, and More [Premium]

Working memory is that short term memory that you use when we’re trying to keep information in mind just long enough to do something else, like writing down a telephone number, or the page numbers for a homework assignment. Working memory is often referred to as a mental juggler because it is what allows the brain to […]
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Scientific American on the Advantages of Dyslexia

Great to see Scientific American covering the advantages of dyslexia…

Excerpt: “Dyslexia is often called a “learning disability.” And it can indeed present learning challenges. Although its effects vary widely, children with dyslexia read so slowly that it would typically take them a half a year to read the same number of words other children might read in […]

Adults with Dyslexia – Visual Crowding Not Related to ADHD

Another research group finds that dyslexic adults have large visual crowding effects that affect reading. Importantly this paper found that the visual effects were unrelated to the presence of ADHD.