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Our Vision is a World Where Dyslexic Individuals are Known for their Strengths

Q & A: Can Someone Be Both Dyslexic and Autistic ? [Premium]

QUESTION: Is it Possible to Have Both Dyslexia and Autism? The short answer is yes, but it’s likely not very common and in general many of the features of dyslexia and autism are opposite. By strict criteria, low IQ and autism are excluded from the diagnosis of dyslexia. However, it is not difficult to speculate […]
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New US ADHD Guidelines from Department of Education OCR – Schools

 In breaking news, the US Department of Education and Office for Civil Rights have released their a letter from Asst Secretary Catherine Lhamon and its Students with ADHD and Section 504 Resource Guide HERE. For your convenience, we also include them below  – including a highlighted version which spotlights key passages for parents and […]

Unleash Dyslexic Writing with Dr. Nicole Swedberg [Premium]

In step-by-step fashion, learn how to unleash the dyslexic writing talent of students through Dr. Nicole Swedberg’s idea of Mini-Writes. The webinar is free for premium subscribers ($5 per month, cancel at any time). Dr. Nicole Swedberg has generously donated this 20-minute webinar on Teaching Writing to LD Kids as a fundraiser to support the […]
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Your Brain on Jane Austen – Attention Deficit or Attention Super Power?

“I certainly have not the talent which some people possess,” said Darcy, “of conversing easily with those I have never seen before. I cannot catch their tone of conversation, or appear interested in their concerns, as I often see done.” – Jane Austen from Pride and Prejudice

Literary neuroscientist  Natalie Phillips travelled to Stanford to […]

Executive Function: What Smart People Do Differently While Learning [Premium]

When researchers compared high IQ and average test subjects in a learning paradigm, the results were surprising. In some areas high IQ individuals work less, as might be expected by the idea that higher IQ people have more efficient brains for learning tasks, but in other areas, high IQ brains were working harder. When were […]
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