Bridging the Gap to Reading Long Words [Premium]

Bridging the Gap to Reading Long Words [Premium]

 In our last post, we wrote about the 3rd grade gap or wall. Dyslexic students typically get through the hard slog of phonemic awareness and then parents and teachers breathe a sigh of relief. Many times, the extra work fades away and students are integrated back into their usual classroom routine. All seems well, but a problem may remain. Reading remains effortful and the complexity of the text goes up. Students may not be able to keep up. With little extra help and too little time to complete assignments, the “guess and go” approach may dominate the reading strategy so that the gap between peers increases. A large part of the problem may be that students have not effective strategy to read long words. These problems can come […]

To access this post, you must be Premium subscriber.

read more
Teaching Chemistry to Students with Dyslexia [Premium]

Teaching Chemistry to Students with Dyslexia [Premium]

Although High School Chemistry is required for many of the top 4 year liberal arts colleges and college Chemistry is a necessary requirement for many majors and careers that many dyslexic students excel in like engineering or medicine, there is a surprising lack of resources available to students having their first encounter with chemistry  – and that may make things tricky, especially if they’re also juggling a full load of classes. For Premium subscribers, here are a few tips and strategies for surviving and even thriving at chemistry. Chemistry can be a field that dyslexics do extremely well at because they can visualize, rotating molecules in space, and picture their interactions and energy transformations.  The main challenge is often at the beginning – when all the […]

To access this post, you must be Premium subscriber.

read more
Teaching Science to Students with Dyslexia – Middle School [Premium]

Teaching Science to Students with Dyslexia – Middle School [Premium]

Adolescents are at a stage of development when they need to be in an environment where they can experience independence, growth, cooperation, and creativity; however, the typical middle school provides an environment that stresses competition, grades, relative ability, and rote memorization.” – From The Middle School Experience: Effects on the Math and Science Achievements of Adolescents with LD Perhaps because of dyslexic strengths in direct observation, causal reasoning, and analytical problem solving, the subject of science in middle school present opportunities for talent and possibly future career development. The potential obstacles facing students with dyslexia with interests in science are several: extensive technical vocabulary, similar sounding but distinct terms, writing demands for essays and lab notebooks, however teaching strategies based on students’ relative strengths and learning preferences […]

To access this post, you must be Premium subscriber.

read more
Harvard Genetics Professor George Church on Dyslexia and Failing [Premium]

Harvard Genetics Professor George Church on Dyslexia and Failing [Premium]

“If you’re not failing, You’re probably not trying as hard as you could be.” – Dyslexic Harvard Genetics Professor George Church From Harvard’s Gazette: Church had an erratic path through higher education like many dyslexic students, but his path shows a lot of ingenuity, passion, and dogged persistence in spite of not learning to read well. As a young person: “I was using books — even though I had a lot of trouble reading. By using the index and using photographs, I could figure out just about anything. So that kind of set me on a course of independent study. I was not particularly well adapted socially. I had dyslexia, narcolepsy, OCD, ADD — all these things were very mild, but made me feel different.” […]

To access this post, you must be Premium subscriber.

read more
Individual Differences: How Do You Remember ? [Premium]

Individual Differences: How Do You Remember ? [Premium]

How do you remember what happened?  As depersonalized facts and happenings? Or detailed sensory scenes and experiences? In one of the clearest demonstrations studies so far, researchers showed striking differences between how different people told them how they remembered and brain connectivity patterns. The research is relevant to everyone, of course, whether parents, teachers, or team leaders. From Science Daily, “For decades, nearly all research on memory and brain function has treated people as the same, averaging across individuals,” said lead investigator Dr. Signy Sheldon, now an assistant professor of Psychology at McGill University. “Yet as we know from experience and from comparing our recollection to others, peoples’ memory traits vary. Our study shows that these memory traits correspond to stable differences in brain function, even when we […]

To access this post, you must be Premium subscriber.

read more
New Research: Brain Scans Predict Cognitive Performance [Premium]

New Research: Brain Scans Predict Cognitive Performance [Premium]

“This suggests that individual differences in many cognitive tasks are a stable trait marker.”   There’s a new Oxford research study circulating through scientific communities and around the world. From Science (Task-free MRI predicts individual differences in brain activity during task performance), Tavor and collegues applied machine-learning principles to test subjects in a “resting state” to see how they could predict their performances on various cognitive tasks. What was the result? They could predict subject’s responses in 46 out of 47 tasks (and maybe there’s a reason why the 47th one didn’t work…it involved more subcortical activity). Tasks included responses to mental math, sentence and story processing, but also higher order problem solving, social perception, and working memory. The data have a lot of ramifications in […]

To access this post, you must be Premium subscriber.

read more
Discoverer of the Titanic –  Dyslexic Ocean Explorer Robert Ballard [Premium]

Discoverer of the Titanic – Dyslexic Ocean Explorer Robert Ballard [Premium]

“When I was a child, I wrote a letter to an oceanographic institution in California called Scripps (Scripps Institution of Oceanography UC San Diego). It was a Dear Santa Claus letter. “Dear Scripps, I want to be an oceanographer.” I’m sure I misspelled it, because I’m dyslexic. They gave me a scholarship.” – Robert Ballard When I was seventeen, 56 years ago, I went on my first expedition. We got caught in a storm, hit by a rogue wave, and I thought that was so cool. I was too young to be afraid. I just fell in love with adventure with a purpose, where you go out there and overcome the obstacles that you’re always faced with, and then you find this secret, whether it’s a shipwreck like the Titanic, or […]

To access this post, you must be Premium subscriber.

read more
Why Are So Many Dyslexic Student Good at Science?  [Premium]

Why Are So Many Dyslexic Student Good at Science? [Premium]

Nobel Prize winners, MacArthur Geniuses, Engineers of the Century, SiliconValley pioneers, and more. Why are so many dyslexic people exceptional at science and tech? Here are 5 Reasons (there are many more…):

To access this post, you must be Premium subscriber.

read more

LEARN MORE AS A PREMIUM SUBSCRIBER

Dyslexia and Gifted: Course for Psychologists

Dyslexia for Teachers Course

Categories

SPONSORS

    Discover Your Dyslexic MIND Strengths
                                    Free

 

 

 


Amazon Affiliate Notice

Dyslexic Advantage is an Amazon Affiliate. If you click on a link that takes you to the Amazon store, Dyslexic Advantage may earn money on qualifying purchases. Clicking HERE to enter Amazon and making a purchase may support Dyslexic Advantage. Thank you!

LEARN MORE AS A PREMIUM SUBSCRIBER

Dyslexia | Dyslexic Advantage