shutterstock_111191270-resilience“Do you conceptualize an event as traumatic, or as an opportunity to learn and grow?…”

Resilience is a topic that’s one of our favorites because although people may temperamentally vary in how much they have of it, science shows that it is trainable, it helps people through difficult life challenges, and generally helps everyone lead more fulfilled lives.

Recently The New Yorker published How People Learn to Become Resilient (also see below):

“What was it that set the resilient children apart? Because the individuals in her sample had been followed and tested consistently for three decades, Werner had a trove of data at her disposal. She found that several elements predicted resilience. Some elements had to do with luck: a resilient child might have a strong bond with a supportive caregiver, parent, teacher, or other mentor-like figure. But another, quite large set of elements was psychological, and had to do with how the children responded to the environment. From a young age, resilient children tended to “meet the world on their own terms.” They were autonomous and independent, would seek out new experiences, and had a “positive social orientation.” “Though not especially gifted, these children used whatever skills they had effectively,” Werner wrote. Perhaps most importantly, the resilient children had what psychologists call an “internal locus of control”: they believed that they, and not their circumstances, affected their achievements. The resilient children saw themselves as the orchestrators of their own fates. In fact, on a scale that measured locus of control, they scored more than two standard deviations away from the standardization group…”

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